Posts tagged ‘oscar de la renta’

April 30, 2011

Read my lips (and between the lines). The royal fashion reviews are in.

TheIndependent.com


Prince William: You look beautiful.

Eric Wilson: The gown was well received not merely because it was pretty — or flawless, actually. This was also a significant fashion moment because the design of the dress, the selection of its designer and even the secrecy that surrounded its preparation seemed remarkably well calculated to project a specific image about Miss Middleton. That is, she represents a new breed of the British monarchy, one that is respectful of its boundaries and traditions, but is not stuffy and off-putting to the general populace.

Hamish Bowles: I think it’s magnificent. Entirely lived up to and exceeds anyone’s expectations. It’s a traditional style, but it’s been tweaked in a nuanced way. It has great body and stiffness and architectural drama, but it’s very light and airy. … It’s perfect and highly sophisticated. A triumph.

Leila Rose: I think the dress is perfectly beautiful but somewhat uninspired. … Knowing it’s coming from Sarah Burton — and she is so enormously talented — I expected a little bit more of pushing the envelope.

Robin Givhan: In the end, the McQueen gown, designed by the house’s creative director,  Sarah Burton, and hand-sewn by the atelier, did not change Western  fashion as the world knows it. It did not alter everything that defines  modern femininity. And it did not force a reassessment of what it means  to be elegant, sophisticated or sexy. But it was a gasp-inducing,  slightly sexy gown worn by a beaming bride. It put a giddy smile on the young prince’s face and caused him to seemingly murmur: You look  fabulous. And really, what more can one expect or hope for a wedding  dress to do?

 Annabel Tollman It’s McQueen doing royal wedding. It’s not runway. But can you imagine if it had [been]? It would not have been a great start. The fashion industry would love it, but…this is not the Grand Palais. It’s Royalty. You don’t really want her turning up in look 12.

Julia Panciroli: With McQueen designing, I was wondering if there would be feathers on it, or edgier materials and embellishment. Although I didn’t like the style of Princess Diana’s gown, it was more sensational than Kate’s.

Lily Samii: The gown was nice and clean, but I wanted it to have more style. It was blah; it didn’t wow me.

Mark Badgley:  It’s the kind of gown that will stand the test of time. Not all gowns do. Any bride across the world will want to wear it. It’s got a touch of vintage, a classic 1950s ball gown, so timeless that her daughter would look gorgeous in this gown 30 years from now.

 James Mischka: She’s not taking a lot of chances with this dress, but in the best possible way.

Hubert de Givenchy: It’s a lovely thought, a nice tribute[to McQueen].

Oscar de la Renta:  She had a perfect dress, a very traditional dress for a very traditional wedding. What I liked about it was, it was not ostentatious. There was not 50 meters of train, and it was not overembroidered. It was just a very traditional dress for a ravishing girl who doesn’t need a lot.

Vera Wang: Diana’s dress had a sense of innocence, whimsy, almost storybook romance. In contrast Catherine’s gown was about way more than simply the dress. Sarah Burton channeled a new take on classicism for a modern-day bride who will one day be queen.

Tom Kolovos: A tasteful, understated and conservative dress may indeed serve as both economic and political spin. On a personal level for Catherine, a commoner, a reverential dress can signal that she intends to straddle the  fine line of ascending to the ranks of royalty without betraying her commoner lineage. We have already heard how she intends to live with Prince William without the help of any staff and even do her own cooking and laundry. The savvy Duchess of Cambridge may share more than a couturier and a milliner with Lady Gaga. She may be humming to herself  “don’t be a drag, just be a Queen,” just loud enough to drown out the noise of the spin cycle.

Karl Lagerfeld: The dress is classic and goes very well in the Westminster decor. It almost reminds me of (Queen) Elizabeth’s wedding, the royal weddings in the (19)50s. The proportion of the train is good. The lace is very pretty. I like the veil a lot.



February 18, 2011

Dresses I’d like to see at the Oscars–Part 4



From top: Oscar de la Renta, Reem Acra, Naeem Khan, Costello Tagliapietra, Bill Blass. All images from Style.com

October 18, 2009

Every picture tells a story, don’t it?

tom_kolovos_wordpressnew

All dressed up and nowhere to go? You’re not alone.

You’ve got the 4 models in the Victor Skrebneski produced fashion feature in the 27th anniversary issue of Today’s Chicago Woman to keep you company.  Spread on the floor, each in a 2 page spread,  in various stages of orgasmic exhibitionism which every couture clad professional gal surely finds herself now and again and again, the first model appears to be using her bejeweled bangled hand to pocket pool herself and, when she reappears at the end, she’s using her entire forearm to anally….WTF?

“Success stories don’t get much better than this” proclaims the cover. Really? Yes, the caption does, in all fairness, refer to the real estate agent on the cover but who cares about her and her success when Skrebneski locates the multiple listing service in your G spot?

In stark contrast, and  as conceived by Maurizio Cattelan and  photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari, the cover of the November issue of W magazine is  part of what the editors describe as a “politically and religiously charged portfolio” starring Linda Evangelista.

I can’t guarantee that what you’ll find inside the pages of the 4th annual “art issue” has any more or less artistic merit than what you find inside Today’s Chicago Woman, but  I am sure that the cover photo has a  politically charged urgency that taps into the global zeitgeist and that stops you dead in your tracks as it sets your mind racing.

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Here’s the surreal juxtaposition of Linda”I don’t get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day” Evangelista, the most cinematic of the 80’s “greed is good” supermodels, a good deal more rotund  than current standards allow but no less the superb “still actress” she always was, holding a cardboard sign that declares “IT MUST BE SOMEBODY’S FAULT.”

As obvious as the cardboard sign is to read (and agree with if it refers to the global economic meltdown), what it means depends on how you read it. For starters, where in that sentence is the correct inflection? (Fans of the masterful film writer and director John Sayles will recall the “I didn’t ask for the anal probe” scene from Passion Fish.)

And how does one read that sign given the rest of the images in the photo?

She’s is, after all, wearing an Oscar de la Renta dress and $1,699,000.00 in De Beer’s diamond jewelry including a double cross. She’s perfectly manicured, coiffed and made up but the expression on her face is alarmingly vacant.  What, if anything, is really bothering, bewildering and bewitching her? An American flag can be seen  clearly affixed to a building behind her. The gaze of the suited black male is ambiguously affixed to her? To us? To the studly white uniformed male intruding in the right foreground?

Who is she? Victim? Perpetrator? Prophet? Judge? Jury? Grand Inquisitor?  Who are the men and who are they to her?

And what is IT? The spectacular fall of the supermodel? The divulsion of the unregulated derivative/Bernie Madoff ponzi economy?  The inability of Miley Cyrus to, like,  construct a proper sentence in, like, English ? The collapse of the luxury goods market? Is she sympathetic or pathetic?

Life imitated art Thursday night, making the timing of the politically and religiously charged portfolio even more prescient, at a town hall meeting in New Orleans where President Obama was asked by Tyren Scott, a  4th-grader, “Why do people hate you? And why, aren’t they supposed to love you, if God is love?”

The President came up with an unfortunately  simplistic and patronizing answer, as if to prove that you can graduate from Harvard and teach at the University of Chicago, but you’re still not smarter than a 4th grader. When Frank Rich and Maureen Dowd have lost any semblance of faith in your competence, you’re just stroking your own oversize ego when you declare:

“First of all, I did get elected president, so not everybody hates me; I got a whole lot of votes. A lot of it is what’s called politics, where once one party wins, the other party feels like they’ve got to poke you a little bit to keep you on your toes. So you shouldn’t take it too seriously.”

Seriously, Tyren, IT MUST BE SOMEBODY’S FAULT. And after 9 months of on the job ineptitude on foreclosure reform, health care reform, banking reform, immigration reform. ‘don’t ask don’t tell” reform and evisceration of every campaign promise by special interest politics, the fault lies squarely with Barck Obama. Location, location, location.

Good art sometimes thrives on ambiguity and even derives its meaning from it. Political leadership does not.

TheBestDressedList.com

tomkolovos.com