Posts tagged ‘interior design’

April 22, 2011

London Calling (The no imitation zone)

aControlledSubstance online exclusive:

Rick Shultz  photographs the London flat he and designer Jimmie Karlsson share with their cats  Christy & Phoenix. Then we play a game of “10 Questions with Jimmie.”


10 Questions with Jimmie

aCS: How would you describe your design aesthetic?

Jimmie Karlsson: Fun, unexpected and imperfect. A mix with old and new.



aCS: Is it/is it not particularly English?

JS: I think it is very London. But also quite New York, where we have a lot of clients.  Our furniture is defenitly not Swedish, although  both Martin and I are Swedish.



aCS: Do you consider yourself a designer, an artist, a furniture maker?

JS: I’m a furniture designer and interior designer. Some people think I am an artist. I paint on furniture, but I don’t really consider myself an artist.


aCS: What motivates you?

JS: Every day life. Positive people and my passion for interiors. 


aCS: What is your formal training?

JS: I haven’t  a design degree. I studied art in Sweden before moving to London in 1998. It was always a hobby that turned into an unplanned business in 1994. So here we are!


aCS: What bores you?

JS: Arrogance. Copycats. Pretentious people. Negativity.

aCS: The copycats are too busy being beige. You needn’t worry. Yet!


aCS: What is style?

JS: The freedom to express ourselves and shape the life we live.

aCS: An answer after my own heart, Jimmie!


aCS: What is luxury?

JS: To be able to do what you love to do and get paid for it.

aCS: Amen to that brother. Long live SWEA!


aCS: Who/what are your influences?

JS: It comes from every day life. The streets, news, art, people, music, travel… 


aCS: What is your favorite object to design/conceive/produce?

JS: My favourite thing is to do an interior design job for a client who gives us free rein  to create.

Jimmie Karlsson and Martin Nihlmar are the London based JimmieMartin  furniture design firm. The duo along with partner Sally Anne McCoy compose the interior design firm Jimmie Martin and McCoy

All images are the sole property of aContolledSubstance.com and courtesy of Rick Schultz at rickschultz.co.uk. They may not be used in any manner without express consent. All links must credit both parties above.

Advertisements
April 21, 2011

Under the Radar and Over the Top: In Chicago with Anthony Michael’s sneek peek at history in the making

Prior to this project, I had been working on more contemporary and modern residences of similar size, though my formal training is in the historical type and style exhibited here. Imagine my glee when  the client was adamant  that the project  proceed only if I agreed to design it.

Let me give you an aCS exclusive peek into the process I undertook to create what I call La Residence de Printemps dans l’esprit de Louis XVI.  Anthony Michael


THE exterior of this magnificent 30,000 square foot residence was inspired by a private residence just outside the gates of the palace at Versailles. The  materials used throughout this project required a whirlwind of excursions to secure both the quality and the highest level of design.  The floral, caryatids, and keystones were painstakingly conceived first in clay mockups and then in stone mock ups in Toronto. All architectural components required a study of light and shadow. The carvings above the series of arches  are designed to embrace the flora of spring and to soften the regimented appearance of this somewhat imposing residence.

The ornamental ironwork, every inch hand drawn and hand forged, was executed by one of the oldest and most respected blacksmith operations in North America, Historical Arts and Casting in Utah.The exterior of the original French residence is limestone. The climate in Chicago, however, made that a poor choice, so silverdale was selected because it has the same color and texture as the original French residence’s limestone. The silverdale was selected from a quarry in Kansas.  To ensure consistency an entire horizontal plateau was reserved and carved purely for this residence.

THE garden was  inspired by a private residence in Lake Forest, IL  and was executed by Craig Bergmann Landscape Designs, responsible for a considerable amount of work at the esteemed Morton Arboretum. More importantly,  Bergamann’s aesthetic appealed to me. Along with the client, all three of us worked in the design and execution of the gardens. The fountains alone require a filtration system generally reserved for full fledged swimming pools. The mature plantings were selected in order to instill a sense of permanence and time.


THE extraordinary floor of the foyer was inspired by Pierre Yves Rochon ‘s design for the  George V  Four Seasons in Paris. The stones I used here include combrune, blue de savioe, juane de siene ( very, very rare) and versailles. I personally examined every inch of space to ensure adherence and consistency in the installation and execution. The stone floors were water jet cut and assembled by the fabricators in France.  Epoxy along with specialized netting was fastened to the back of each and every cut and the floors were packed and flat shipped via container and brought directly to the job site. Once installed ten grindings were executed with various “pads/screens” to ensure seamless and uniform installation throughout.

After 18 months and several trips back and forth to Paris and the northern regions near the Pyrenees, I hand selected each and every piece based on consistency of color, movement of veining patterns and depth. The overall goal was to select stone which in all its nuances would create a sumptuous floor pattern that would mesmerize the viewer.


THE client’s request for the kitchen was that we maintain a sense of  “coziness” within the grand scale of the space and as well as a sense of tradition. By using different finishes and wood species, we managed to provide a timeless and elegant kitchen which is reminiscent of a bygone era.

The kitchen is actually composed of a series of rooms, each unique for its purpose and the function. For example, a room is dedicated strictly to the high temperature grilling, because the grill is unsightly and somewhat loud. The grill room located beyond the stove/oven space manages to leave the kitchen area less cluttered, emphasizing instead the 21st century appliances.

To the right of the stove/oven space, I designed a kitchen manager’s office. This space is dedicated to meal planning and shopping. It also serves as a  message center and provides sweeping views of the rear gardens. Who wouldn’t want to plan an elegant feast in this bespoke room?

 THE staircase required 9 moths to produce at a cost well into the six figures. It is inspired by the famed Musee Nissim de Camondo in Paris and features 22 carat gold and bronze details. We designed the staircase to accommodate a rather tight rotunda along with  differentiated heights on each level.

I poured over 5 years of my life into designing every detail of this commission of a lifetime. I logged well over 300 hours per month in the creation of an extraordinary home which takes up 7 contiguous city lots in one of Chicago’s most elite neighborhoods and includes  staff quarters, a 5000 plus wine cellar, 12 plus baths and a separate catering kitchen designed to accommodate 500 dinner guests. In terms of dollar per square foot, it is currently unmatched by any residence in the USA. Not since the institution of the income tax in 1921 has anyone designed and built  a residence  such as this one. I am honored to be an integral part of this beautiful project.

Anthony Michael is the principal and founder of Anthony Michael Interior Design in Chicago. See more of his work at AnthonyMichaelInteriorDesign.com You can see his design for a Trump Tower pied-a-terre in the current issue of Modern Luxury’s Interiors Magazine.

February 25, 2011

Design: Jimmie Martin

Maybe it is the impending Academy Awards that has me seeing “Black Swan,” “The Social Network,” and “The King’s Speech” references in places where they don’t necessarily belong, let alone in furniture design.

But something about the furniture of the English duo Jimmie Martin, usually referred to as “rock and roll” in style, feels cinematic to me, at the very least evoking the graphic design of movie posters. But this year, especially when scrawling figured so prominently in both “Black Swan” and “The Social Network,” and when perfection and communication were dominant themes, their work  seems ripe for reflection.


.Since 2004, Jimmie Martin has provided an eclectic showcase of one-of pieces of furniture combining the decadent and quirky with the nostalgic and urban. All pieces are individually finished off to either the customer’s personal taste, or to the ideas of the founders, Jimmie and Martin.

One of a kind and custom pieces available through Kara Mann Showroom in Chicago.