Posts tagged ‘art’

May 5, 2011

Wall, a monumental work by Tony Smith

Tony Smith (1912–1980) is best known for his large modular sculpture in black painted steel of the 1960s and ‘70s. Frequently described in the context of Minimalism, Smith’s elegant and powerful contribution to twentieth century sculpture is represented in the collection of every major US museum, including MoMA, the Met, the Smithsonian, the Whitney, the Detroit Institute
of Arts, and the Walker.

Valerie Carberry Gallery and Wright collaborate to present Wall, a monumental work by Tony Smith from 1964. This special exhibition is the first presentation of a major work by Smith in Chicago in over forty years.

A sleek mass in painted steel, Wall achieves harmony in concept and form. Smith frees Wall from its architectural function as divider or barrier and creates a stand-alone object that celebrates our relationship to pure form: a sublime viewing experience on a human scale.

On view at Wright, 1440 West Hubbard Street from May 6th – 20th, Monday – Friday 10am – 5pm, with an opening reception May 5th, 5 – 8pm.

Tony Smith, Wall, 1964, steel, painted black, 96 x 216 x 24 inches. Courtesy of Matthew Marks Gallery. © 2011 Tony Smith Estate/Artists Rights Society
(ARS), New York

Wright, the Chicago-based international auction house of art and design, has been a leader in the industry since its founding in 2000. Wright has pioneered whole fields of collecting and transformed the market for modern design.

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May 4, 2011

Alexander McQueen: Plato’s Atlantis video


Read the “Savage Beauty” exhibit review in The New York Times

May 4, 2011

Alexander McQueen: Kate Moss hologram Fall/Winter 2006-07 “Widows of Culloden”

April 25, 2011

COLOR PRINCE: The Photography of Ernest Collins

A Chicago native, Ernest Collins was known as one of that city’s top hair-stylists and make-up artists. In 1983, Ernest ventured to Milan. There, he was well received, having the opportunity to work with photographers Tiziano Magni, Tom Wool, Jonathan Leonard, Sergio Caminata, Lionel Pasquon among others.

After years of working with some of fashion photography’s biggest names, Ernest decided that it was time to try his own hand at the craft. He knew that his biggest advantages were his sense of style, his growing reputation as a model-maker, his ability to grace models with a “look”, his own personal sense of direction, and ultimately the ability to  capture those elusive qualities through his lens–to photograph it all. Bold, strong saturated color is one of the hallmarks of Ernest’s photographs.

In 1990, he accepted an invitation to come to Paris and instantly fell in love with the city. He has been based there ever since. Ernest now resides between Paris and Chicago and is immersed in both cultures.

He has photographed ad campaigns for some of the biggest names in the world of beauty. His editorial work has graced the pages of Europe’s most cutting edge  magazines.

Meeting and working with Ernest Collins 5 years ago has been one of the true joys of my professional life. I am proud to welcome Ernest Collins to aControlledSubstance–Tom Kolovos

April 19, 2011

Andres Serrano’s photograph ‘Piss Christ’ destroyed by Christian protesters in France

Attack on ‘blasphemous’ art work fires debate on role of religion in France

• Intruders vandalise photo day after Christian protest
• Exhibitor blames Sarkozy speech for inflaming issue

Read article in The Guardian here

October 18, 2009

Every picture tells a story, don’t it?

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All dressed up and nowhere to go? You’re not alone.

You’ve got the 4 models in the Victor Skrebneski produced fashion feature in the 27th anniversary issue of Today’s Chicago Woman to keep you company.  Spread on the floor, each in a 2 page spread,  in various stages of orgasmic exhibitionism which every couture clad professional gal surely finds herself now and again and again, the first model appears to be using her bejeweled bangled hand to pocket pool herself and, when she reappears at the end, she’s using her entire forearm to anally….WTF?

“Success stories don’t get much better than this” proclaims the cover. Really? Yes, the caption does, in all fairness, refer to the real estate agent on the cover but who cares about her and her success when Skrebneski locates the multiple listing service in your G spot?

In stark contrast, and  as conceived by Maurizio Cattelan and  photographed by Pierpaolo Ferrari, the cover of the November issue of W magazine is  part of what the editors describe as a “politically and religiously charged portfolio” starring Linda Evangelista.

I can’t guarantee that what you’ll find inside the pages of the 4th annual “art issue” has any more or less artistic merit than what you find inside Today’s Chicago Woman, but  I am sure that the cover photo has a  politically charged urgency that taps into the global zeitgeist and that stops you dead in your tracks as it sets your mind racing.

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Here’s the surreal juxtaposition of Linda”I don’t get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day” Evangelista, the most cinematic of the 80’s “greed is good” supermodels, a good deal more rotund  than current standards allow but no less the superb “still actress” she always was, holding a cardboard sign that declares “IT MUST BE SOMEBODY’S FAULT.”

As obvious as the cardboard sign is to read (and agree with if it refers to the global economic meltdown), what it means depends on how you read it. For starters, where in that sentence is the correct inflection? (Fans of the masterful film writer and director John Sayles will recall the “I didn’t ask for the anal probe” scene from Passion Fish.)

And how does one read that sign given the rest of the images in the photo?

She’s is, after all, wearing an Oscar de la Renta dress and $1,699,000.00 in De Beer’s diamond jewelry including a double cross. She’s perfectly manicured, coiffed and made up but the expression on her face is alarmingly vacant.  What, if anything, is really bothering, bewildering and bewitching her? An American flag can be seen  clearly affixed to a building behind her. The gaze of the suited black male is ambiguously affixed to her? To us? To the studly white uniformed male intruding in the right foreground?

Who is she? Victim? Perpetrator? Prophet? Judge? Jury? Grand Inquisitor?  Who are the men and who are they to her?

And what is IT? The spectacular fall of the supermodel? The divulsion of the unregulated derivative/Bernie Madoff ponzi economy?  The inability of Miley Cyrus to, like,  construct a proper sentence in, like, English ? The collapse of the luxury goods market? Is she sympathetic or pathetic?

Life imitated art Thursday night, making the timing of the politically and religiously charged portfolio even more prescient, at a town hall meeting in New Orleans where President Obama was asked by Tyren Scott, a  4th-grader, “Why do people hate you? And why, aren’t they supposed to love you, if God is love?”

The President came up with an unfortunately  simplistic and patronizing answer, as if to prove that you can graduate from Harvard and teach at the University of Chicago, but you’re still not smarter than a 4th grader. When Frank Rich and Maureen Dowd have lost any semblance of faith in your competence, you’re just stroking your own oversize ego when you declare:

“First of all, I did get elected president, so not everybody hates me; I got a whole lot of votes. A lot of it is what’s called politics, where once one party wins, the other party feels like they’ve got to poke you a little bit to keep you on your toes. So you shouldn’t take it too seriously.”

Seriously, Tyren, IT MUST BE SOMEBODY’S FAULT. And after 9 months of on the job ineptitude on foreclosure reform, health care reform, banking reform, immigration reform. ‘don’t ask don’t tell” reform and evisceration of every campaign promise by special interest politics, the fault lies squarely with Barck Obama. Location, location, location.

Good art sometimes thrives on ambiguity and even derives its meaning from it. Political leadership does not.

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